Are you facing a difficult clinicial situation ? Please post the query on the forums.

  • Sharebar

Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

6 replies [Last post]
sushantpatel_doc's picture
Offline
Joined: 30 Nov 2009

Hydrogen Peroxide Found to Have No Negative Health Effects.
Common tooth whitening products, which have been used by millions of people, are found to be safe and do not increase the risk of oral cancer when used as directed. This exhaustive review of the literature, including numerous unpublished clinical studies involving over 4,000 human subjects, appeared in an article by Dr. Ian Monroe entitled, " Use of Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Tooth Whitening Products and it Relationship to Oral Cancer," published in Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry.

Clinical and laboratory data on tooth whitening products show no evidence for the development of oral cancer or of other effects that could be associated with increased oral cancer risk. Exposures to hydrogen peroxide, generally the effective ingredient in tooth whiteners, are too low and of too short of a duration (30–60 minutes) to cause any oral tissue changes that could enhance risks for oral cancer development. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide rapidly decline to near undetectable levels usually within 15 to 60 minutes.

Given the likely use of tooth whitening products by smokers, the review also sought to examine any possibility of increased oral cancer development due to combined exposure (i.e., hydrogen peroxide and carcinogenic agents that are present in cigarette smoke). A possible combined-effect, as seen in the increased likelihood of lung cancer development in smokers also exposed to asbestos, was found to be groundless with regards to bleaching and smoking and further illustrates the relative safety of tooth whitening products.

up
0 users have Like. User Likes
drmithila's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 May 2011
Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

New findings published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggest that metformin may protect against oral cancer.
J. Silvio Gutkind, Ph.D., chief of the Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues induced premalignant lesions in laboratory mice and studied the effect of metformin on progression of these lesions to oral cancers.
"We saw strong activity against mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), which we know contributes to oral cancers, so this is strong preclinical information that there is a protective effect," said Gutkind.
Metformin is the most widely used treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes, and scientists have started to notice a trend toward cancer reduction in a number of organ sites.
Gutkind and colleagues found that administration of metformin reduced the size and number of carcinogen-induced oral tumoral lesions in mice and significantly reduced the development of squamous cell carcinomas by about 70 to 90 percent.
They found that metformin inhibited mTORC1 function in the basal layer of oral premalignancies and prevented their spontaneous development into head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.
"We clearly saw a direct effect on premalignant lesions," said Gutkind.
Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:

Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:
Share on blogger Share on digg Share on fark Share on linkedin Share on myspace Share on newsvine Share on reddit Share on stumbleupon | 28
Story Source:
The above story is reprinted from materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), via Newswise.

 

up
0 users have Like. User Likes

An easy way for you to share and discuss dentistry and more...

For any help on posting on the site, email at [email protected]

An easy way for you to share and discuss dentistry and more...

For any help on posting on the site, email at [email protected]

drsushant's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 May 2011
carbamide peroxide agents in bleachers

The addition of fluoride and calcium to carbamide peroxide-based whitening agents can minimize mineral loss in tooth enamel during bleaching treatments, according to a study to be published in the September 2010 Quintessence International (Vol. 41:8, pp. e157-e165).

A group of Brazilian researchers divided sound enamel slabs into six groups (n = 10):

Placebo gel
Whiteness (10% carbamide peroxide, FGM)
Opalescence F (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride, Ultradent)
Pola Night F (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride, SDI
Experimental gel 1 (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride)
Experimental gel 2 (10% carbamide peroxide plus calcium)
The samples were submitted to six-hour gel applications daily for 14 days and stored in remineralizing solution after treatment. Enamel microhardness measurements were performed at baseline and after bleaching. In addition, the analytical concentrations of fluoride and calcium and the pH of the water used to rinse the bleached surface were analyzed using ion-selective electrodes, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and pH meter, respectively.

The researchers found that enamel surface microhardness significantly decreased after bleaching with nonenhanced 10% carbamide peroxide. The chemical analyses suggested that fluoride uptake was promoted by the high-concentrate fluoride bleaching gels (Opalescence F, Pola Night F, and experimental gel 1), while fluoride loss occurred with nonenhanced 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gels (placebo gel and Whiteness). The carbamide peroxide agent enhanced with calcium (experimental gel 2) also prompted calcium enamel uptake.

up
0 users have Like. User Likes

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info

DrAnil's picture
Offline
Joined: 12 Nov 2011
Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

Irish dentists have welcomed new EU regulations which control the use of a chemical used in tooth whitening products.

The directive from the European Council regulates the use of hydrogen peroxide. Specifically, it bans the use of tooth whitening products which contain over 6% of the chemical. It also states that tooth whitening can only be carried out on a patient if the procedure is being supervised by a dentist.

Meanwhile, people under the age of 18 will not be allowed use these products at all.

Last month, the Irish Dental Association (IDA) expressed serious concern about some tooth whitening products. It claimed that many of these products ranged from ‘useless to dangerous'.

It also expressed concerned about unsupervised tooth whitening and insisted that only fully-qualified dentists should be allowed to provide such services.

Under this new directive, products that contain up to 0.1% of hydrogen peroxide will still be available to consumers. However, when it comes to products that contain between 0.1% and 6% of the chemical, a dentist must carry out a full clinical examination and the first treatment. After that, patients can continue the treatment themselves.

Commenting on the new directive, Dublin-based dentist and IDA member, Tom Feeney, said that patient safety ‘is the number one priority' and this move will enhance that.

"The new regulations ensure that properly qualified dentists are carrying out what is a dental procedure, that safe products are being used and that the treatment is restricted to those over 18," he said.

He pointed out that tooth whitening is a safe procedure ‘if carried out by a dentist'. However, he warned that it should not be carried out too often.

"As a rough guide once a year should be sufficient. We don't recommend it for pregnant women or heavy smokers or drinkers as it can cause particular problems for each of these groups," he added.

Each EU member state will have 12 months to incorporate the directive into national legislation following its publication in the Official Journal of the EU.

 

up
0 users have Like. User Likes
Drsumitra's picture
Offline
Joined: 6 Oct 2011
Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

The addition of fluoride and calcium to carbamide peroxide-based whitening agents can minimize mineral loss in tooth enamel during bleaching treatments, according to a study to be published in the September 2010 Quintessence International (Vol. 41:8, pp. e157-e165).

A group of Brazilian researchers divided sound enamel slabs into six groups (n = 10):

Placebo gel
Whiteness (10% carbamide peroxide, FGM)
Opalescence F (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride, Ultradent)
Pola Night F (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride, SDI
Experimental gel 1 (10% carbamide peroxide plus fluoride)
Experimental gel 2 (10% carbamide peroxide plus calcium)
The samples were submitted to six-hour gel applications daily for 14 days and stored in remineralizing solution after treatment. Enamel microhardness measurements were performed at baseline and after bleaching. In addition, the analytical concentrations of fluoride and calcium and the pH of the water used to rinse the bleached surface were analyzed using ion-selective electrodes, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and pH meter, respectively.

The researchers found that enamel surface microhardness significantly decreased after bleaching with nonenhanced 10% carbamide peroxide. The chemical analyses suggested that fluoride uptake was promoted by the high-concentrate fluoride bleaching gels (Opalescence F, Pola Night F, and experimental gel 1), while fluoride loss occurred with nonenhanced 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gels (placebo gel and Whiteness). The carbamide peroxide agent enhanced with calcium (experimental gel 2) also prompted calcium enamel uptake.

 

up
0 users have Like. User Likes
drsushant's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 May 2011
Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

With the increasing desire for superwhite smiles, at-home dentist-supervised tooth bleaching has become quite common.

To increase the longevity and effectiveness of whitening, manufacturers of tray-based systems for home bleaching have increased the carbamide peroxide concentration in their products.

Now a new study from Brazil has found that a higher carbamide peroxide (CP) concentration does not increase the longevity of the whitening effect of at-home tooth bleaching agents or the resulting tooth shade level (Journal of the American Dental Association, September 2009, Vol. 140:9, pp. 1109-1117).

The same whitening effect can be seen up to one year postbleaching independent of the bleaching agent's concentration, said lead author Flavio Fernando Demarco, D.D.S., Ph.D., an associate professor in the departments of operative dentistry and epidemiology at Federal University of Pelotas, in a DrBicuspid.com interview.

Randomized controlled trial

Dr. Demarco and his colleagues conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the longevity of the whitening effect of two custom tray bleaching systems -- one with a 10% carbamide peroxide concentration (CP10) and the other with a 16% concentration (CP16) -- at one year.

“The use of higher carbamide peroxide concentrations ... is not necessary to obtain a better whitening effect.”
— Flavio Fernando Demarco,
D.D.S., Ph.D.
They divided 92 participants into two equal-sized groups according to the carbamide peroxide concentration of their tray. Participants used the tray for two hours daily for three weeks. After this treatment, the researchers evaluated tooth shade with a shade guide and a spectrophotometer at baseline, one week, six months, and one year after bleaching.

At the one-year recall appointment, both groups had significantly lighter teeth. The group treated with CP16 had lower tooth shade values than the CP10 group at the one-week and six-month evaluations, but the researchers did not observe this difference at the one-year recall.

Previous studies have shown that higher-concentration agents can whiten teeth faster than lower-concentration ones, but similar effects can be achieved with both high- and low-concentration agents after a few weeks.

Dentists should avoid using concentrations higher than 10% CP for at-home tooth bleaching due to the increased risk of developing tooth sensitivity, Dr. Demarco said.

Although more than 50% of participants in both treatment groups did not report any kind of tooth sensitivity, the participants treated with 16% CP group experienced more tooth sensitivity in the first and third weeks of treatment than those treated with 10% CP, he said.

"Our findings have demonstrated that the use of higher carbamide peroxide concentrations for at-home tooth bleaching is not necessary to obtain a better whitening effect or an increase of its longevity when compared to 10% CP use," Dr. Demarco said.

"The American Dental Association (ADA) published guidelines for the acceptance of dentist-dispensed home-use tooth bleaching products. On the basis of the results of published clinical trials, these guidelines ensure the benefits, safety, and effectiveness of carbamide peroxide applied in a tray at a concentration of 10%," the authors concluded.

Avoid 16% carbamide peroxide?

Does that mean that dentists should instruct patients to avoid products with a carbamide peroxide concentration of 16%, since both concentrations yield the same results in the long run?

Munther Sulieman, B.D.S., from the department of oral and dental science at the University of Bristol Dental School in the U.K., who has also done research on this topic (Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, March 2006, Vol. 18:2, pp. 93-100), does not think so.

"It means that the current volume of research and safety data is mostly on 10% CP, hence its recommendation," Dr. Sulieman explained. "With time and more research data on 16% CP, it too would then become an accepted concentration."

Increased whitening speed is the main benefit of using the 16% concentration, he noted.

Because it is the accepted standard, Dr. Sulieman's policy is to start with 10% CP where possible unless time is an issue. However, it is important to be aware of the increased risk of sensitivity when using higher concentrations, he warned.

"The final shade change is independent of the concentration of bleaching agent, with time as the dominant variable," Dr. Sulieman concluded in his study. "Higher concentrations of CP that have not been investigated previously may be a treatment option for aesthetic improvement of shade where time is at a premium, but caution must be exercised in view of the possible increased incidence of sensitivity."
By Dr.Rabia Mughal

up
0 users have Like. User Likes

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info

drsushant's picture
Offline
Joined: 14 May 2011
Tooth Whiteners Do Not Cause Cancer

Metformin is the most widely used treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes, and scientists have noticed a trend toward cancer reduction in a number of organ sites, noted the study authors (CPR, March 31, 2012).

J. Silvio Gutkind, PhD, chief of the Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research at the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues induced premalignant lesions in laboratory mice and studied the effect of metformin on progression of these lesions to oral cancers.

They saw strong activity against mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), which contributes to oral cancers, indicating a protective effect.

The study found that administration of metformin reduced the size and number of carcinogen-induced oral tumoral lesions in mice and significantly reduced the development of squamous cell carcinomas by about 70% to 90%. The researchers found that metformin inhibited mTORC1 function in the basal layer of oral premalignancies and prevented their spontaneous development into head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

up
0 users have Like. User Likes

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info

 Post your case presentations on www.dentistrytoday.info