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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

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DrPatel's picture
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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste
3M ESPE

Our patients often ask us to recommend a specific toothpaste for their home use. It is reasonable for them to expect that the dentist, hygienist, or assistant be in a qualified position to make a suitable suggestion for this essential part of home care. Toothpastes must be efficient, effective, and easy to use. In addition, there are 2 additional major consumer decision points—the taste and the quantity of foaming during brushing. Should these criteria not meet the patients’ expectations, they will exhibit a resistance to using the product, thereby allowing increased dental and soft-tissue problems over time. Dental professionals have additional toothpaste parameters: abrasiveness, remineralization potential, fluoride content, fluoride-releasing potential, and more recently, whitening capacity. 3M ESPE has introduced its Clinpro 5000 1.1% sodium fluoride anti-cavity toothpaste. It is an innovative, tri-calcium phosphate, low-abrasion dentifrice that provides a gentle cleaning with whitening results. Its 1.1% sodium fluoride delivers more fluoride to the tooth and has been shown to increase surface microhardness. Clinpro 5000 contains 5,000-ppm fluoride ions, providing greater remineralization and greater fluoride uptake. In fact, it has been shown in clinical studies to strengthen teeth. Calcium and fluoride ions cannot typically coexist over an extended period of time without reacting. Clinpro 5000’s manufacturing process involves the development of a protective barrier around the calcium that permits it to remain stable in the presence of fluoride ions. Once this mixture contacts saliva, however, during toothbrushing in the patient’s mouth, the barrier breaks down, making the fluoride, calcium, and phosphate readily available to the tooth. Clinpro 5000 provides safe and effective cleansing for exposed root surfaces, particularly in older patients. For more information, visit 3mespe.com.

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Dr.Sachin Barsu Kinage's picture
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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

hello sir....... what is the cost of this paste....? 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

 colgate gel kam can also be prescibed. availability is a problem. some other anti cavity toothpastes are also available like kid-o-dent etc

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Raise your practice level by a  comprehensive three session hands on  course on ADHESIVE DENTISTRY. It  will cover light cure composites, glass ionomers etc. The course will cover and the participants will get an hands on experience of almost categories of restorative materials. The course is conducted regularly in Dr. Veerendra Darakh's Dental clinic.

Contact darakh[at]vsnl.com for more details.

 

 

Raise your practice level by a  comprehensive three session hands on  course on ADHESIVE DENTISTRY. It  will cover light cure composites, glass ionomers etc. The course will cover and the participants will get an hands on experience of almost categories of restorative materials. The course is conducted regularly in Dr. Veerendra Darakh's Dental clinic.

Contact darakh[at]vsnl.com for more details.

 

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

Scientists have created a new molecule that may make teeth cavity-proof and may change dental care forever.

The new molecule, named Keep 32, after the 32 teeth in a normal human mouth, can wipe out bacteria that cause cavities in just 60 seconds.

Researchers José Córdoba from Yale University and Erich Astudillo from the University of Chile say that the molecule can be added to any dental care product, like toothpaste and mouthwash and even to products like candies and chewing gum.

Researchers say that as long as the product stays in your mouth for 60 seconds, it will kill all the Streptococcus Mutans, bacteria that transforms the sugar in your mouth into lactic acid which attacks your tooth enamel, making your teeth cavity proof for a number of hours.

Cordova and Astudillo had started researching in 2005, and they want to bring their product to the market in 14 to 18 months, right after they pass human safety trials in the United States.

The researchers say they want to license the patent to dental care manufacturers such as Colgate and Procter & Gamble, and snacks such as Hershey's and Cadbury Trevor.

"We are currently in talks with five interested in investing in our project or buy our patent, which will involve moving abroad to complete product development," he told Chile's Diario Financiero

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), an independent regulator of the advertising industry in the U.K., is taking issue with an advertisement for Colgate-Palmolive's Colgate Total toothpaste, according to an adjudication posted on its website.

The television and video-on-demand advertisement in question features a nurse at work talking about the antibacterial qualities of the toothpaste, and then shows the woman visiting her dentist and his recommendation to use the product.

The ASA has received seven complaints about the ad, which claim that by featuring a nurse at work and a reference to fighting bacteria, the ad misleadingly implies the product is endorsed by members of the nursing profession.

However, Colgate-Palmolive responded that the ad features an actress cast as a nurse who informs viewers that even a nurse, who was likely to deal with bacteria on a daily basis, might not be aware of the bacteria levels in the mouth. The company noted that the ad includes a disclaimer that states "Representation of nurse."

The nurse appears as an individual and a consumer, and makes references only to herself and not on behalf of any other members of the nursing profession, the company said. It believed that the overall impression was clearly fictitious and viewers would not view the ad as recounting the experience of a real nurse, or as portraying an endorsement by the nursing profession in general.

The ASA, however, has concluded that the ad is misleading. "The ad must not appear again in its current form," the organization stated. "We told Colgate not to imply that products were endorsed by healthcare professionals in the future, unless that was the case."

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

Both Colgate and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), which manufactures Sensodyne, are seeking to appeal certain NAD findings to the National Advertising Review Board.

NAD, the advertising industry's self-regulatory forum, examined claims in broadcast advertising and print advertising directed at oral care professionals. Claims at issue included:

"Gets to the nerve faster for long-lasting relief"
"A clinically proven formula that works fast, within 2 weeks, to provide relief to the nerve and builds a protective shield to help prevent painful sensitivity flare-ups when used as directed"
"Part of a new treatment solution for dentin hypersensitivity"
"Rushes to the nerve for faster relief. Superior formula delivers potassium nitrate to the nerve more quickly for faster relief"
Following its review, NAD determined that the advertising at issue did not convey the message that Colgate's product provides immediate or instant relief and that the advertiser could support standalone claims that the product is effective.

However, NAD determined that the evidence in the record did not support Colgate's claims that its toothpaste works "faster" than Sensodyne to relieve pain and recommended that the advertiser discontinue "faster" claims, including both general claims to be faster and quantified claims that appear in advertising directed to professionals.

NAD recommended that Colgate either discontinue the broadcast advertising at issue or modify the advertising to ensure that it no longer conveys the unsupported "faster" message and the claim that the product is "clinically proven better" than the leading sensitivity toothpaste.

With respect to the advertising directed to professionals, NAD recommended that Colgate either discontinue its "over 30% more relief ... at 2 weeks" and "29% more relief ... at 8 weeks" claims or modify these claims by clearly disclosing that the results were only seen in one of two test methods.

Finally, NAD recommended that Colgate either discontinue the graphs that are shown in the professional advertisement or modify them so the scales do not visually exaggerate the differences between the products.

GSK is seeking to appeal a portion of NAD's decision regarding Colgate's use of the percentage differentials in materials directed to a professional audience.

Colgate, in its advertiser's statement, said the company would appeal NAD's findings that Colgate had insufficient support for certain superiority claims for Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief vs. Sensodyne, as well as NAD's rejection of Colgate's time-to-improvement analysis.

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

Vella 5% sodium fluoride varnish with Xylitol is available in bubble gum flavor

Vella is intended to treat hypersensitivity. It is especially suited for treating younger children who struggle with the fluoride tray technique. Vella goes without lumps and clumps.
Hygienists like Vella, too. With twice as many bristles, Vella’s 2.0 ultra brush applies more product faster. This means fewer trips to the well to help ensure a faster, less-messy, thin-layer application.
Vella sets quickly in contact with saliva and dries clear. An independent study shows Vella delivers four times the fluoride uptake in treated enamel when compared to a leading brand.
Ask for Vella in strawberry, spearmint, melon, and bubble gum flavors

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

The debate involving fluoride rages on.

A recent Harvard University study indicated that children living in areas with high fluoride content in water have significantly lower IQs than children living in areas with less fluoride. The study looked back at 27 previous investigations of fluoride and made many conclusions.

It’s conceivable that fluoride may be a development neurotoxicant, according to the study. The level of fluoride that hinders brain development in children is a much lower level than would impact an adult.

Rats that came into contact with low fluoride concentration in water displayed cellular changes in their brains. They also saw higher levels of aluminum in the brain tissue.

Some studies have even concluded that there’s a correlation fluoride and beta-amyloid plaques, something often seen in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. Fluoride may also adversely affect the brains of fetuses and newborn babies.

Still, like many previous studies regarding fluoride, much research is necessary before passing off this information as fact. There are other factors that may contribute to these health problems.

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

There may be a new way to determine the abrasiveness of toothpaste.

A group of researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM in Halle, Germany recently conducted a study on the subject.

The cleaning particles in toothpaste were examined. These are the particles utilized to mechanically remove dental plaque. If the toothpaste is too abrasive, the tooth enamel can be damaged over time. The damage can be even more pronounced in the dentin.

The abrasive impact of a certain toothpaste on the dentin depends on the hardness level and the quantity and size of the abrasive additives. The abrasiveness was measured on a scale from 30 to 200. The values were assigned after the testers brushed over radioactively marked dentin samples.

The method used in this study differed from the traditional radiotracer system that’s used to determine the abrasiveness of toothpaste.

Human teeth were also part of this study. To achieve the results, toothpaste was diluted with water and saliva to create a solution that corresponded to the mixture of toothpaste and saliva. The friction and wear tests were conducted with a single bristle. An advanced machine was then used to carry out the tests.

The findings from the survey went into intricate details. The results were able to explain the various geometries of toothbrush filaments and how they reacted with toothpaste based on numerous factors.

 

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There are various types of toothpaste available on the market. They come as pastes and gels, there are some that guard against tooth decay or protect teeth from acid attack, others that are designed for sensitive teeth. But which toothpastes clean well? Which preserve the tooth enamel? A new evaluation method sheds light on the subject.
Everyone wants to have beautiful teeth. After all, a perfect set of teeth symbolizes health and youthfulness, and can even influence career prospects. If having pristine teeth calls for thorough oral hygiene, then how well or badly does a given toothpaste clean? How effective is it? What should it contain in order not to damage the structure of the teeth? Such questions are primarily of interest to manufacturers of dental hygiene products, and answers are being delivered by researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM in Halle. Through close collaboration with the Microtribology Centre µTC in Karlsruhe they have developed a new process for testing the abrasive effect of toothpastes, allowing this 'abrasivity', as experts call it, to be compared and evaluated in the lab.
Dangerous abrasive effect
Cleaning particles are an important component of toothpastes. These abrasives, as they are known, mechanically remove dental plaque. Nevertheless, the paste should not be too strongly abrasive. Over the years the abrasion can cause damage to the tooth enamel, which does not regenerate itself. This damage is more visible and pronounced in the soft dentin. The German Dental Association recommends that people choose less abrasive toothpaste if the necks of their teeth are exposed.
The abrasive effect of a particular toothpaste on tooth dentin depends on the hardness, amount and particle size of the abrasive additives it contains, such as silica or alumina. Abrasivity is measured as the RDA value (radioactive dentin abrasion), ranging from 30 to over 200. This value is determined via a complex process that involves testers brushing over radioactively marked dentin samples. The abraded material is then measured via the resultant radiation intensity of the toothpaste slurry. Not all experts agree on the validity of RDA values, as test results have been known to vary partly from lab to lab.
Determining abrasion rates with microtribological tests
The researchers at the IWM have chosen an alternative method to this radiotracer system. "Our new approach enables us to determine realistic abrasion rates and characterize the interaction between brush, enamel and toothpaste. What's more, our tests are less laborious than the time-intensive radiotracer procedures carried out by only a handful of laboratories worldwide," says Dr. Andreas Kiesow, team leader at the IWM. The scientist and his team have successfully managed to determine the abrasion of various toothpastes on a microscopic scale and to measure the friction values using microtribological experiments. "Until now, tribological values such as friction coefficient, did not exist" says Kiesow.
The researchers use human teeth as well as different toothpastes made by industrial partners for their experiments. These toothpastes were diluted with water and saliva in order to create a solution whose consistency corresponds to the mixture of toothpaste and saliva that is present when people brush their teeth. The friction and wear tests were each carried out with a single bristle -- referred to as a monofilament. This is mounted in specialized tribological instruments, a microtribometer and a nanoindenter, and moved over the sample in both straight and circular motions, in the latter case up to 8000 times. Highly sensitive instruments then measure the depth of the resultant marks left on the surface of the tooth.
"Our findings reveal that the RDA value of toothpastes correlates with the depth of abrasion; the higher the value, the greater the abrasion. By analyzing the friction value we also identified a clear relationship between the friction behaviors of the bristle on the dental enamel and the abrasiveness of the toothpaste," sums up Kiesow. The new process allows the researchers to not only characterize the abrasion more quickly and simply, but also to describe how different geometries of toothbrush filaments act upon the surface of the tooth and how the bristle shape should ideally be designed. The experts at IWM can use their know how to support manufacturers of dental hygiene with product development. At the end of the day it is the consumer who benefits most.

 

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

Oral health is a sad state of affairs in Pakistan.

About 95 percent of the people in Pakistan have some kind of untreated dental disease.

Pakistanis are nowhere near the levels in which they should be for oral health based on World Health Organization standards. Many people aren’t even aware of dental services available in their area. The ratio of dentists to people should be at least one dentist for every 20,000 people, according to the World Health Organization. In Pakistan, the best estimates state that there is one dentist for every 200,000 people—and in many areas the figures are even worse.

There are only about 8,500 practicing dentists and 13,000 registered dentists in the entire country. There is no oral health plan to speak of.

The Islamabad Medical and Dental College recently gathered to discuss the future of oral health in the country. Dental colleges are producing about 3,000 graduates each year but that has yet to make a dent on the major shortage of practicing dentists.

One of the main problems is that many of the graduates are women and 70 percent of these women choose not to practice after graduation.

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Clinpro 5000 1.1% Sodium Fluoride Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

Sandra Shapiro, RDH, received her bachelor's degree in dental hygiene and public health from the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry in 1986. Most of her career has been spent practicing clinical hygiene. She currently works for Premier Dental Products as a sales consultant and dental health educator, where her focus is on educating dental offices about the importance of enamel therapy and the use of fluoridated varnishes and remineralizaton technologies.
Dentistry is forever evolving with new technologies. Many feel fluoride varnish is part of the current evolution. This new trend has a lot of potential revenue for dental practices, while it significantly increases your patients' dental health. Let us explore why fluoride varnish is changing the face of dentistry today and why many offices are switching from foams and gel in trays to a fluoride varnish.

In 2006, the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs published evidence-based research with fluoride recommendations. The conclusions from this article are changing the way we practice dentistry. This research recommends topical fluoride treatments based on caries risk. That means it does not matter if the patient is age 2 or 92, if it has been determined they are at moderate to high risk for caries, a fluoride treatment is recommended. The ADA also recommends that these topical fluoride treatments should be done not just two times per year, but anywhere from two to four times annually, depending on risk.

This research also steers away from using the traditional tray system to deliver fluoride. If trays are going to be used, gels, and not foams are supported ONLY if they are used for four minutes. One-minute foam or gel fluoride treatments were determined to be ineffective. And did you know thatonly a fluoride varnish should be used on children age 6 and younger? That's because one of the many benefits of using a fluoride varnish is that there is very little systemic exposure -- about the same as brushing with an over-the-counter toothpaste.

If all this sounds new to you, you are not alone ... many U.S. dental offices (pedo included) are stillnot using varnish. Fluoride varnishes have been used in Europe and Canada since the 1980s for caries prevention. Why is it taking so long to catch on in the U.S.? Until fairly recently, varnish wasn't very user-friendly. It was amber or yellow in color, very sticky, and many were thick to apply, leaving a clumpy or sticky feeling on the tooth surface. Patients did not like how varnish looked and felt on their teeth.

The role of remineralization

The truth is most clinicians are not well-educated about the benefits of fluoride varnish and have no idea how aesthetic and user-friendly varnish has become.

Today all varnish contains 5% sodium fluoride with 22,600 ppm fluoride ions. They help occlude tubules and prevent sensitivity, as well as release fluoride to be taken up into the tooth. Each is made from a resin and an alcohol-based solution that is fast-drying. Application is simple: minimally dry teeth and paint a thin strip along a tooth surface. This procedure takes only seconds.

Once set, varnish adheres to the tooth surface, and fluoride ions are released into the saliva. Saliva is the key with varnish -- it is the delivery mechanism for the fluoride ions.

It is important to understand that not all varnishes are created equal. They can vary in taste, texture, thickness, color, and price. But the most important differentiation is how therapeutic the various varnishes are. The release of fluoride ions from the varnish material and uptake of fluoride ions into teeth varies from varnish to varnish. Varnishes with calcium phosphate technologies release and uptake more fluoride than those without the technology. The unique chemical kinetics of calcium, phosphate, and fluoride together create an amazing arsenal in the war against dental disease and root sensitivity.

Currently, only three varnishes contain remineralization (calcium phosphate) technology: Premier Dental's Enamel Pro Varnish with ACP (amorphous calcium phosphate), 3M ESPE's Vanish with TCP (tricalcium phosphate), and GC America's MI Varnish with CPP-ACP (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate; Recaldent). So which is the most therapeutic?

Independent research done at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry showed that Enamel Pro Varnish had the greatest release of fluoride ions when compared with 3M Vanish and Colgate Duraphat. In addition, Enamel Pro Varnish is the only varnish formulated to deliver ACP, which has been shown to be more effective in fluoride release and uptake when compared with Vanish with TCP (Journal of Clinical Dentistry, 2011, Vol. 22:2, pp. 51-54).

Advantages of ACP

Why ACP? Think about it -- the reason clinicians do fluoride treatments is to deliver fluoride into the tooth. ACP's unique formulation allows greater uptake due to the amorphous nature of the calcium. That unstructured, positively charged calcium ion is so attracted to the negatively charged tooth surface it calcifies on contact and pulls the available fluoride and phosphate ions into the tooth structure with it.

ACP strengthens the teeth by releasing more usable fluoride to be taken into the tooth and also remineralizes tooth structure with calcium and phosphate. This combination of fluoride and ACP is so powerful that it has been shown to diminish hydraulic conductance of dentin by 73%; this semipermanent occlusion is a result of ACP and fluoride creating fluorapatite.

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